Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/11681/6546
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dc.contributorU.S. Army Snow, Ice, and Permafrost Research Establishment.-
dc.contributor.authorUnited States. Army. Corps of Engineers. New England Division.-
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-23T20:17:11Z-
dc.date.available2016-03-23T20:17:11Z-
dc.date.issued1952-06-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11681/6546-
dc.descriptionTechnical Report-
dc.descriptionSummary: This report presents the results of an exploratory test series which constitutes the initial phase of an investigational program whose purpose is to determine methods of describing and classifying frozen soils and to determine the strength characteristics of frozen soils. The investigation was performed by the Frost Effects Laboratory, New England Division, Corps of Engineers, U. S. Army, for the Snow, Ice and Permafrost Research Establishment, Corps of Engineers, U. S. Army, located at Wilmette, Illinois. Previous studies of frozen soil' characteristics were conducted principally in Russia. Available translations of the Russian reports have been reviewed and the results have been summarized in this report. Where feasible, the results are compared with those obtained in the present investigation. However, the basic data on materials, test conditions and procedures are frequently incomplete in the Russian reports, and correlation is therefore difficult. Laboratory investigations were conducted at the Frost Effects Laboratory on artificially frozen soil specimens. Ten types of soils were tested, ranging from non-frost susceptible sandy gravels and sands to frost susceptible silt and clay soils, and including one peat soil. Tests were also performed on artificially frozen ice specimens prepared under the same conditions as the frozen soil specimens. Specimens of two clay soils and the peat were trimmed from undisturbed samples. Specimens of the remainder of the materials were prepared for freezing in the remolded condition. The samples were placed in molds and fully saturated prior to freezing. They were frozen from the surface down, with water available at the base of the samples, at a sufficiently slow rate to permit development of ice segregation in the frost susceptible soils.-
dc.publisherArctic Construction and Frost Effects Laboratory (U.S.)-
dc.publisherEngineer Research and Development Center (U.S.)-
dc.relationhttp://acwc.sdp.sirsi.net/client/en_US/search/asset/1024653-
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSIPRE report ; 8.-
dc.rightsApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.-
dc.sourceThis Digital Resource was created from scans of the Print Resource-
dc.subjectFrozen ground-
dc.subjectFrozen soils-
dc.subjectPermafrost-
dc.subjectElasticity-
dc.subjectElastic properties-
dc.subjectSoil mechanics-
dc.subjectFrozen ground mechanics-
dc.subjectCompression-
dc.subjectShear strength-
dc.subjectTensile strength-
dc.subjectSoil classification-
dc.titleInvestigation of description, classification, and strength properties of frozen soils : fiscal year 1951, volume 1 : report of investigations with appendix A-
dc.typeDOCUMENT-
Appears in Collections:Technical Report

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