Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/11681/6527
Title: Frost investigations : cold room studies : third interim report of investigations, volume 1
Authors: United States. Army. Corps of Engineers. New England Division.
Keywords: Soils
Frozen soils
Frozen ground
Permafrost
Soil mechanics
Frozen ground mechanics
Frost
Frost penetration
Frost heave
Frost heaving
Frost action
Freezing
Thawing
Testing
Tests
Cold room studies
Publisher: Arctic Construction and Frost Effects Laboratory (U.S.)
Engineer Research and Development Center (U.S.)
Series/Report no.: Technical report (Arctic Construction and Frost Effects Laboratory (U.S.)) ; no. 43.
Description: Technical Report
Summary: The effects of several individual factors which influence the formation and growth of ice lenses in different types of soils are shown. Test results are presented showing the effect of variations in the initial dry unit weight of sandy, silty and clayey soils. For sandy gravelly soils there appears to be an optimum initial dry unit weight at which ice segregation is a maximum, for silts heaving increases continuously with increasing density. Limited tests on clayey soils indicate that ice segregation is diminished with increase in initial dry unit weight. Overburden pressure or surcharge on a frost-susceptible soil is shown to reduce the rate of heaving, the effect being more pronounced in the silts and glacial tills than in the clay type soils. Tests performed in the closed system (no free water available at bottom) show that ice lenses may form in the upper portion of the soil by transfer of soil moisture from the lower portion. Results of freezing tests, wherein the depth to water table was varied from 6 to 42 inches in glacial till, indicated that heaving was greatly reduced when the source of water was more than 18 inches below the freezing plan. Other data are presented showing the effect of disturbance of soil structure and of variations in natural soil gradations. It is concluded that the gradation of a soil still offers the most expedient means of recognizing a potentially frost-susceptible soil.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/11681/6527
Appears in Collections:Technical Report

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