Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/11681/47719
Title: Spatial screening for environmental pool management opportunities
Authors: Neipert, Elizabeth S.
Steissberg, Todd E.
Theiling, Charles H.
Keywords: Reservoirs--Water levels
Wetlands--Effect of water levels on
Riparian areas--Effect of water levels on
Restoration ecology
Environmental management
Remote sensing
Remote-sensing images
Publisher: Engineer Research and Development Center (U.S.)
Series/Report no.: Technical Report (Engineer Research and Development Center (U.S.)) ; no. ERDC/EL TR-23-9
Abstract: US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) reservoir projects significantly alter river ecosystem structure and function. Each project adheres to a defined set of operating rules to achieve primary objectives, which typically include flood risk management, hydropower, or navigation along with ancillary objectives for drinking water/irrigation, recreation, and natural resources management. Environmental flows (E-Flows) planning under the Sustainable Rivers Program has demonstrated new opportunities for environmental pool management (EPM; Theiling et al. 2021a, 2021b) that have no negative impact on other reservoir functions. In some locations, water level drivers can be managed to improve ecological outcomes, like wetlands, waterbirds, reptiles, and water quality, by altering the magnitude, timing, frequency, and duration of pool level changes that affect riparian and shoreline plant communities. Reservoirs with large delta areas may provide particularly important wetland or riparian habitat management along avian migratory pathways or in wildlife conservation regions (Johnson 2002). These large deltas can be identified and characterized using available satellite imagery, which along with water level habitat drivers available in hydrology databases, can be used to identify USACE reservoirs with good potential for EPM. A spatial analysis of USACE reservoirs capable to support EPM can be developed utilizing estimates of water occurrence, transition, and seasonality as well as surface elevation data derived from satellite imagery to assess geomorphology drivers. USACE water management records can be used to assess wetland drivers. Nationwide screening will be broken down into ecoregions to establish the anticipated geographic range of variation for wetland and riparian habitat drivers. Southwestern US reservoirs, for example, will have much different hydrology and fauna than Midwest and Eastern US reservoirs.
Description: Technical Report
Gov't Doc #: ERDC/EL TR-23-9
Rights: Approved for Public Release; Distribution is Unlimited
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/11681/47719
http://dx.doi.org/10.21079/11681/47719
Appears in Collections:Technical Report

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
ERDC-EL TR-23-9.pdf3.18 MBAdobe PDFThumbnail
View/Open