Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/11681/42742
Title: Assessing the mechanisms thought to govern ice and snow friction and their interplay with substrate brittle behavior
Authors: Lever, J. H.
Asenath-Smith, Emily
Taylor, Susan
Lines, Austin P.
Keywords: Tribology
Wear
Pressure-melting
Self-lubrication
Quasi-liquid layers
Abrasion
Ice-rich slurries
Publisher: Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (U.S.)
Engineer Research and Development Center (U.S.)
Series/Report no.: Miscellaneous Paper (Engineer Research and Development Center (U.S.)) ; no. ERDC/CRREL MP-21-34
Is Version Of: Lever, James H., Emily Asenath-Smith, Susan Taylor, and Austin P. Lines. "Assessing the mechanisms thought to govern ice and snow friction and their interplay with substrate brittle behavior." Frontiers in Mechanical Engineering 7 (2021): 57. https://doi.org/10.3389/fmech.2021.690425
Abstract: Sliding friction on ice and snow is characteristically low at temperatures common on Earth’s surface. This slipperiness underlies efficient sleds, winter sports, and the need for specialized tires. Friction can also play micro-mechanical role affecting ice compressive and crushing strengths. Researchers have proposed several mechanisms thought to govern ice and snow friction, but directly validating the underlying mechanics has been difficult. This may be changing, as instruments capable of micro-scale measurements and imaging are now being brought to bear on friction studies. Nevertheless, given the broad regimes of practical interest (interaction length, temperature, speed, pressure, slider properties, etc.), it may be unrealistic to expect that a single mechanism accounts for why ice and snow are slippery. Because bulk ice, and the ice grains that constitute snow, are solids near their melting point at terrestrial temperatures, most research has focused on whether a lubricating water film forms at the interface with a slider. However, ice is extremely brittle, and dry-contact abrasion and wear at the front of sliders could prevent or delay a transition to lubricated contact. Also, water is a poor lubricant, and lubricating films thick enough to separate surface asperities may not form for many systems of interest. This article aims to assess our knowledge of the mechanics underlying ice and snow friction.
Description: Miscellaneous Paper
Gov't Doc #: ERDC/CRREL MP-21-34
Rights: Approved for Public Release; Distribution is Unlimited
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/11681/42742
http://dx.doi.org/10.21079/11681/42742
Appears in Collections:Miscellaneous Paper

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