Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/11681/32673
Title: Treatability of Ninth Avenue Superfund Site groundwater
Authors: Zappi, Mark E.
Teeter, Cynthia L.
Fleming, Elizabeth C.
Francingues, Norman R.
Keywords: Hazardous waste sites--Indiana--Gary
Groundwater--Purification--Indiana--Gary
Sewage--Purification--Activated sludge process
Carbon, Activated
Groundwater--Purification
Hazardous waste sites
Indiana--Gary
Publisher: Environmental Laboratory (U.S.)
U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station.
Series/Report no.: Miscellaneous Paper (U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station.) ; no. Miscellaneous Paper EL-91-8
Abstract: The Ninth Avenue Superfund Site is located in Gary, IN, and has been listed on the US Environmental Protection Agency's National Priorities List since 1973. The site is a 17-acre (68,800-sq m) inactive chemical disposal area within a relatively undeveloped, low-lying area. Past disposal activities resulted in the contamination of the underlying groundwater, predominantly with ketones, benzenes, phenols, and chlorinated aliphatic compounds. Four technologies were evaluated on the bench scale for their ability to remove organic contaminants from a composite of groundwater samples collected from six site observation wells. These technologies were activated sludge (aerobic biotreatment), activated sludge with powdered activated carbon (PAC) addition, air stripping, and activated carbon. The results indicate that activated carbon does not have a high sorptive capacity for the site contaminants. Air stripping did not exhibit a high potential for efficiently removing the contaminants from the composite sample. The Ninth Avenue Superfund Site is located in Gary, IN, and has been listed on the US Environmental Protection Agency's National Priorities List since 1973. The site is a 17-acre (68,800-sq m) inactive chemical disposal area within a relatively undeveloped, low-lying area. Past disposal activities resulted in the contamination of the underlying groundwater, predominantly with ketones, benzenes, phenols, and chlorinated aliphatic compounds. Four technologies were evaluated on the bench scale for their ability to remove organic contaminants from a composite of groundwater samples collected from six site observation wells. These technologies were activated sludge (aerobic biotreatment), activated sludge with powdered activated carbon (PAC) addition, air stripping, and activated carbon. The results indicate that activated carbon does not have a high sorptive capacity for the site contaminants. Air stripping did not exhibit a high potential for efficiently removing the contaminants from the composite sample.
Description: Miscellaneous Paper
Gov't Doc #: Miscellaneous Paper EL-91-8
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/11681/32673
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