Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/11681/20749
Title: State-of-the-art for assessing earthquake hazards in the United States. Report 16, The relation of sustained maximum ground acceleration and velocity to earthquake intensity and magnitude
Authors: St. Louis University. Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences.
Soils and Pavements Laboratory (U.S.)
Nuttli, Otto W.
Keywords: Acceleration
Accelerograms
Earthquake engineering
Earthquake hazards
Earthquake risk
Earthquakes
Earth movements
Ground motion
Seismology
State-of-the-art studies
Publisher: Geotechnical Laboratory (U.S.)
Engineer Research and Development Center (U.S.)
Description: Miscellaneous Paper
Abstract: Sustained maximum ground acceleration and velocity are measures of the strongest prolonged, rather than peak, acceleration and velocity. In this report the sustained maximum ground acceleration, velocity and duration are given for the accelerograms contained in the California Institute of Technology collection, Parts A-Y. Correlations are presented between sustained maximum acceleration, velocity and the product of acceleration and duration versus MM intensity. In order to compare western United States earthquakes with earthquakes occurring in other parts of the world, relations are developed between the local and Richter magnitude scales and the more universal body-wave and surface-wave magnitude scales. The fall-off of ground acceleration and velocity as a function of distance from the fault rupture and body-wave magnitude is determined for western United States, coastal California and central United States earthquakes. The logarithm of the sustained maximum acceleration is shown to scale as 0.5 times the body-wave magnitude, and the logarithm of the sustained maximum velocity is shown to scale as the body-wave magnitude. The vertical components of ground acceleration and velocity are found to have very nearly one-half the amplitude of the larger of the two horizontal components of strong ground motion for western United States earthquakes. On the average the peak ground acceleration is found to be 1.4 times the sustained maximmn (3 cycles) ground acceleration, and the peak ground velocity 1.75 times the sustained maximum (3 cycles) ground velocity. The semi-empirical equations developed in this report can be used to estimate ground acceleration, velocity and duration at a site if the earthquake magnitude and distance from the fault rupture are known, and/or if the site MM intensity is known.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/11681/20749
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