Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/11681/13359
Title: Cleveland Harbor, Ohio, design for the safe and efficient passage of 1,000-ft-long vessels at the west (main) entrance : hydraulic model investigation
Authors: United States. Army. Corps of Engineers. Buffalo District
Bottin, Robert R.
Keywords: Hydraulic models
Navigation
Water waves
Harbors
Cleveland, Ohio
Ports
Design
Breakwaters
Publisher: Hydraulics Laboratory (U.S.)
Engineer Research and Development Center (U.S.)
Series/Report no.: Technical report (U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station) ; HL-83-6.
Description: Technical Report
Abstract: A 1:100-scale (undistorted) hydraulic model of Cleveland Harbor, Ohio, which included the west (main) entrance to Cleveland Harbor opposite the mouth of the Cuyahoga River; approximately 8 ,800 ft of the harbor shoreline to the east of this entrance, including the western portion of Burke Lakefront Airport; the entire West Basin; Edgewater Marina; and sufficient offshore area in Lake Erie to permit generation of the required test waves, was used to investigate the effects of proposed improvements with respect to ship maneuverability, wave and current action, and riverflow conditions in the western portion of Cleveland Harbor. Proposed improvement plans at the Cleveland Harbor west entrance0 entailed (a) removal of portions of the existing breakwater spurs; (b) deepening and widening of the existing channel; (c) installation of additional breakwaters; and (d) modifications that involved raising and sealing and/or removal of portions of the existing arrowhead breakwaters. A 10-ft-long remote-controlled model ore carrier (representing a 1,000-ft-long vessel), a 120-ft-long wave generator, a model circulation system, wind generators, and an Automated Data Acquisition and Control System (ADACS) were utilized in model operation. It was concluded from test results that: (1.) Existing conditions are characterized by rough and turbulent waves in the west entrance and at various locations in the Lakefront Harbor during periods of storm wave attack. (2.) For existing conditions, the west entrance is not safe and efficient with respect to the navigation of 1, 000-ft-long ore carriers even under fair-weather conditions (wave heights up to 4 ft and winds up to 20 knots (23 mph)). (3.) For the safe and efficient passage of 1,000-ft-long vessels at the west entrance during fair-weather conditions, the east and west breakwater spurs should be reduced in length by a minimum of 200ft and 300ft, respectively (Fair-Weather Plan 1A). (4.) The removal of the 200-ft and 300-ft lengths of the east and west breakwater spurs, respectively (Fair-Weather Plan 1A), will increase wave heights in the Lakefront Harbor. (5.) Considering the safe and efficient passage of 1,000-ft-long vessels through the west entrance during fair-weather conditions and wave protection in the Lakefront Harbor (for all wave conditions), Fair-Weather Plan 4D (300-ft-long, parallel entensions to the outer ends of the arrowhead breakwaters, plus Fair-Weather Plan 1A) appeared to be optimum. (6.) The optimum crest elevation of the west arrowhead breakwater of Fair-Weather Plan 40 (with respect to wave conditions in the Lakefront Harbor) was determined to be +14 ft (Fair-Weather Plan 5G) . This elevation could be lowered to +10 ft probided the structure was sealed (Fair-Weather Plan 5C). (7.) Of the improvement plans tested with the entrance oriented toward the west, Severe-Weather Plan 15 (entrance channel realigned to the west and protected by a 4, 000- ft-long entension to the east breakwater and a 1,000-ft-long entension to the west breakwater) appeared promising considering wave protection in the Lakefront Harbor (for all wave conditions) and orientation of the navigation entrance. Subsequent testing, however, indicated navigational difficulties for severe-weather conditions (wave heights up to 8 ft and winds up to 30 knots (34.5 mph)). (8.) Considering the safe and efficient passage of 1,000-ft-long vessels through the west entrance during severe-weather conditions and wave protection in the Lakefront Harbor (for all wave conditions), Severe-Weather Plan 16 (1,000-ft-long parallel extensions to the outer ends of the arrowhead breakwaters, plus Fair-Weather Plan 1A) appeared to be optimum. NOTE: This file is large. Allow your browser several minutes to download the file.
Rights: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/11681/13359
Appears in Collections:Technical Report

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