Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/11681/11906
Title: Improved drainage and frost action criteria for New Jersey pavement design : phase 2 : frost action
Authors: United States. Federal Highway Administration.
New Jersey. Department of Transportation.
Berg, Richard L.
McGaw, Richard W.
Keywords: Freezing
Frost action
Frost penetration
Frost
Frost heave
Frost heaving
Pavements
Roads
Highways
New Jersey
Cold regions
Soils
Publisher: Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (U.S.)
Engineer Research and Development Center (U.S.)
Series/Report no.: Special report (Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (U.S.)) ; 78-9.
Description: Special Report
Abstract: With, the assistance of the Federal Highway Administration, the New Jersey Department of Transportation (NJDOT) is studying the feasibility of including open-graded drainage layers in their highway pavements. Before constructing actual pavements with open-graded drainage layers they chose to analytically examine the influence of the drainage layer on frost penetration beneath hypothetical pavements. CRREL conducted the analytical study under a contract with the NJDOT. Thermal conductivity values of several New Jersey soils, stabilized drainage layer materials, and pavement samples were measured using the Guarded Hot Plate method or the probe method. Measured values for the soils were somewhat less than predicted from Kersten's equations and ranged from 0.77 to 1.90 Btu/ft hr °F. Measured thermal conductivity values for the pavement samples were also somewhat lower than Kersten's observations. Frost penetration depths were computed using the modified Berggren equations. Mean air freezing indexes used in the computation ranged from 50°F - days in Atlantic City to 480°F - days in Newton. Design freezing indexes ranged from 250°F - days to 900°F - days for the same two sites. Maximum computed frost depths ranged from 0.8 to 2.1 ft beneath conventional pavements, i.e. those without drainage layers. For pavements incorporating an open-graded drainage layer, computed maximum frost depths ranged from 0.8 ft to 1.4 ft. It was concluded that frost penetration beneath a pavement including an open-graded drainage layer would be approximately equal to a pavement without the drainage layer at the same site.
Rights: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/11681/11906
Appears in Collections:Special Report

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